1958 Nuffield 3DL "Universal Three"

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Nuffield_Paul
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1958 Nuffield 3DL "Universal Three"

Post by Nuffield_Paul » Wed Oct 07, 2020 9:26 am

I've started this thread so that I can link my various threads on the Nuff together, and have a thread for the project in general.

My story with Nuffield 3 potters goes back nearly 20 years, which makes me sound old frankly. My Parents, Sister and I Holidayed in Scarborough each summer (and I do still, with my own family), staying at a Caravan Site, belonging to a lifelong friend. The site was a converted smallholding of 11 acres, and had been a small military base (probably RAF) during WW2. They had always had at least one tractor, and for years that was a Nuffield Universal 3. The 3DL had no tinwork fitted, the water pump bearings were shot, wrong front wheels, and there was no steering rim, you drove it using what was left of the spokes, but I always had an inexplicable soft spot for it. One particular summer, a new arrival came, in the shape of a Marshall 802XL, which was bought at farm sale for what appeared then (and particularly now!) to be a very reasonable sum of £1200. The new arrival, which I have spent many happy times driving since, meant the days of the Nuffield were numbered.

The owner offered me the tractor for £100, which I had, but at 14/15, I had no driving licence, and un-supportive / unimaginative parents, who said we had no way of getting it home, despite them having a 1990s Range Rover (Classic), which meant we were only missing a transport trailer to complete the job. To cut a long story short, almost a year of badgering got me nowhere, and Peter eventually had no choice but to sell it elsewhere. Realistically, the only option open to me with the way my parents were, would have been to strip the tractor down into sub 1/2 tonne lumps, and bring it home a bit at a time, but isn't hindsight a wonderful thing?

The person Peter sold the tractor to immediately sold it on for a profit, as did a couple more, and the next time I saw it was summer 2008, when I was 21, at York Auction Centre. The tin-work had been refitted, but the water pump was still knackered, and though clean, she wasn't really much better than she had been in Peters ownership, though now in the hands of a dealer. I probably should've paid more attention to her that day, but I was looking for a Fergy TEF, and bought one privately that day, my first tractor, and the first tractor on our smallholding since my father sold our two Fergies in the early 1990s. Anyway, the Nuffield got to £1100, and ran out of steam, not meeting the dealers lofty reserve, in fact, none of his tractors sold that day. That was the last time I saw that 3DL.

After that, I had the TEF, then two years later tracked down, and bought back one of my Dads original Fergy TE's, but the love of Nuffields didn't go away. I'd originally learned to drive on a 4/65, which I used to till the smallholding with a Howard Select-a-tilth, but that was well worn, and owner would not part with it, I think that is now slowly devolving into a hedgerow tractor somewhere near Fishburn.

Something good to come out of this year, and being furloughed, was that I finally found time to fix a nasty hydraulic leak on our Case IH 895 (another story), and that put me in a position to get it sold, so I had space, funds, and still the drive to get a 3 Cylinder Nuff. Dad was against it, he wanted something like a small International, or a Fordson Major, but as he was contributing nothing towards whatever Tractor was bought, should he really have much say........?

I didn't expect to get anything this year, my job is a little unsteady at the moment, but as long as I stayed within the proceeds of the 895's sale, I would be okay, so I put a wanted ad up for a 3 Cylinder Nuffield, whether 3DL, 3/42, or 10/42, I wasn't desperately bothered about a 3/45, but might have considered it.

Anyway, the hook got a bite. I got a message through from a gentleman in about his 10/42, and arranged to go and have a look. the pictures he'd sent didn't fill me with hope, they weren't good quality, so hard to tell much from them, other than back tyres (which were described as "a little cracked") looked like being absolutely knackered. We went and had a look, it was kept in a container that was open at one end, with a hole or twenty in the roof, but despite this, it looked tidy enough, original paint etc. It was started with a massive truck battery which could barely turn it over, but she did burst into life once the battery finally got it over compression! Next challenge was getting it out, to put this in context, picture this, the container was on a mound of earth, about 18" up from the yard, and in addition to this, a mound had been built up on top of that and the entrance of the container, adding another six to twelve inches of gradient to get the tractor over and down. To make matters worse, it had this massive monstrosity of a grader fitted to the back, with additional weight wafers on it, putting probably the thick end of 3/4 of a tonne on the back of the little Nuff, if not more, so when I backed it out, I had no say in steering, brakes, or anything. Somehow, I don't know how, The tractor and I ended up on the yard, in one piece, the whole manoeuvre taking less than 2 or 3 seconds, and the front wheels may have tank-slapped the container.

In daylight we could look over the tractor. It idled steadily, looked pretty straight, gearbox was good, but the back tyres had cracks you could get your hands in, exasperated by the behemoth of an implement on the back. Steering was light, but it would be, it was barely touching the ground! on inspection every joint on the steering was slack, whether through wear, or through fastenings being loose, so not good.

It drove okay, but revved up sluggish, and breathed a bit out of the crankcase vent, clearly work required. Hydraulics needed a bit of revs to pick the implement up, but that wasn't surprising given the shear size of it.

I reckoned at the very least, it needed all four tyres, and all of the steering joints, kingpins etc doing, with Engine rebuild required in the not too distant future as well. At the absolute most, I was willing to give £2k for it, which in itself was stupidly expensive, and should have offered half it. The seller was disinterested, he wanted at least double my offer. So it went back in the container, I let him do that, as having been well and truly shook up with the first escapade involving that container. Not a bad tractor by any means, but not for me, definitely not at that price.

Back to square one.

The very next day, I was browsing eBay (never a good idea), and stumbled across a very poorly listed "vintage agriculture farming used tractor", the picture was of the dashboard, and I immediately recognised it as a Nuffield. It turned out in fact to be a Universal Three, up in Scotland. Messages between myself and the Owner gave an encouraging story that the engine had been rebuilt, it was nice and original bodywork, and two new front tyres, and one nearly new Goodyear on the back, so potentially only one tyre to change, and largely minor work elsewhere (!) a deal was done via eBay offers, and it was mine.

To be Continued........................
Last edited by Nuffield_Paul on Wed Oct 14, 2020 3:09 pm, edited 2 times in total.


Nuffield 3DL (1958), Ferguson TEA20 (1948), Ferguson TEF20 (1954)

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Re: 1958 Nuffield 3DL "Universal Three"

Post by Nuffield_Paul » Wed Oct 07, 2020 11:39 am

With the Deal done, the next matter was collecting the tractor.

8 years ago, using my bonus pay from Cummins that year, I built a twin axle 10ft x 6ft trailer, specifically for carrying the Fergies, and dimension-ed round some fairly specific requirements for my smallholding. It had a Gross Weight capacity of 2.8tonnes, and weighed just over 600kgs, so a 2.1/2.2 tonne payload. The trailer has, if I'm honest, been something of a white elephant, taking up storage space, cost of construction, etc, and for the number of times I have used it, could have hired a suitable transport trailer, and still been quids in! a useful anecdote for anyone considering buying a trailer, if you'll only use it a couple of times a year, don't bother, just hire one. Nevertheless, it tows lovely, and the Fergies are very stable on it.

The Nuff on the other hand, whilst no longer than a Fergy, is taller, and heavier, and at first, I didn't have a reliable reference as to how heavy it was (I was estimating about 1.75T), a kind person on the Nuffield Facebook page provided a datasheet, which confirmed that the "wet" weights of the 3DL, depending on spec, are up to 1.95T, so we were inside of the weight limit, and I had the knowledge that an empty tank of fuel would reduce that by another 60kgs, drain off the coolant 12-15kgs, and in real desperation, the lubricants around 80-90kgs.

The tow Vehicle was a Hilux Surf. I've owned Land Rovers for years; parental habits rubbed off on me! but grew tired of welding them, so defected to Toyota, which has its own share of problems, which I won''t bore the forum with. More powerful than the Discovery, more comfortable, quieter, etc, the only real issue with it is the ambiguity around what it can actually tow. Its stablemate, the Land-cruiser Colorado / Prado, has identical chassis and running gear, but is a UK market vehicle and as such is plated, 2.8T in this case. The Hilux Surf, 3rd Gen, are all imports, and don't have a plated towing weight, so depending on interpretation, can be as low as 1450kgs (3/4 of the Trucks weight). but Roughtrax, the UK authority on them, give a towing capacity similar to the Colorado, so I went with that.

On the day we were scheduled to go up, we had a couple (!) of minor calamities. First, we still needed to check the oil levels in the diffs, and transfer box. The front diff is encapsulated by a bash guard, and this took an hour to remove. Once that was drained and replenished, then we got underway. Coming off the A1 just north of Newcastle, it felt like we were making heavy going of it, despite an empty trailer. Pulled off the road, to find the left hand rear brake drum of the Surf hot, really hot. Its done this trick before, the automatic adjuster over-adjusts the shoes, and they end up dragging, but it had not given any trouble for some time, a lot of new parts, and I thought it was sorted, evidently not. Strip down, remove the drum, back the adjuster off, and let it cool down, 3/4 of an hour used up in smoking brake dust.

We got underway again, along the A69, and about fifteen minutes since the brake debacle, we got an Audi driver up the back end of the trailer, then he inexplicably backed off, and flashed his lights, with a right hand indicator on, my immediate thoughts were cynical, and not very polite! He stormed past, then I looked back again, and just saw in the mirror what he was flashing about, the tailgate had come off on one side! it wasn't a hinged tailgate, it sat in a groove, and was held in with two anti-loose cotters, which I never liked, I preferred the pins that slide through the hole, and then tilt up, as you can put a latch-hook underneath to stop it bouncing up. We dived onto the road side, thankfully finding minimal damage, but I can well imagine the Audi driver got a shock! might even stop him tailgating a trailer with a tailgate in future!

Now two hours behind schedule, things calmed down a bit, it was a nice day, and traffic wasn't too bad. Got onto the M6, and my dad took over driving. I don't have a B+E Licence yet, so I was driving, legitimately under L plates, with his instruction, even though I've got more experience of towing big trailers than he does. We Stopped for Lunch somewhere near Gretna, then carried on the rest of the way to Bridge of Allan (Stirling). Apart from the brakes, the truck had been no bother, and quite a nice drive, far less energy sapping than the Discovery would have been.

On Arrival at the farm, we met the owner, Bob, and the Farmer who owned the Land. Bob was an elderly chap, not in the best of health, and his appearance suggested why the tractor had been put up for sale. The farmer confided in my dad that he didn't think Bob would survive much longer, which sadly proved to be the case, I found out recently that he passed away 29th September. The doors to the shed were opened, and there she was, stood about 15 foot back from the doors, framed by a mound of straw bales, and like an old sheepdog, almost looking pleased to see me. I was grinning like a Cheshire cat, and I'd already made my mind up she was coming home with us, never a good mindset to have when you're looking at a prospective purchase!

Bob beckoned me to jump on and start her up. The farmer said "she runs as sweet as a nut, never heard one as good", but when she fired up, that wasn't the case, she hunted horribly, but nonetheless, I drove the tractor out into the yard to have a go, and see if she settled down. The hunting didn't disappear, but looking at the fuel pump, I recognised the governor arrangement, being much like that on the TEF, so said to my Dad "If its been stood a bit, I reckon the diaphragm may be perished" and guidance on here later backed that up. I rested my hand on each of the injector pipes, and No.3 seemed a little down on the other two, "either the governor is making it do that, or the delivery valve might be sticking, so I think it'll be alright", so that was it, deal done, tractor loaded and paid for.

It was the loading that started to give me an inkling that things were going to be more complicated than hoped for. The Nuff was heavy, and moved the trailer about as such, as I drove her on. Once on, everything sat nice and level, and there was no undue load on the hitch, if anything it could have took more, but as I had drove right up to the headboard, I could not go any further forward. We strapped her down at that.

After that, we said our goodbyes, as we expected a similarly long journey home. I drove first, and took it very steady until we got on the main road. once on the road, I picked up the speed, up to around 40mph, which was appropriate for the load and the nature of the road. It was on joining the dual carriageway/motorway things got tricky. I got to apprixmately 46/47, and the back end started to wander, so pulled over and put more air in the tyres, around 60 psi for each of the trailer wheels. It didn't improve much, and still weaved at the previous speed.

We pulled into the next services, and using the service station air compressor, set the tyres to 80psi, which was the right pressure based on working back from max load/max pressure (which is 90psi @ 2800 for these wheels). We put some more air in the tractors tyres as well, to keep them sturdy, and then checked the truck all round. Back on the road, and things got slightly better, but not much, 48 was about the best we could get without the back weaving, on the level. as soon the gradient began to fall, you had to back right off, to stop the weave starting. Uphill was a different matter, as the gradients rose, we could put our foot down, and get up to 53 or more, but that was about it, so a long journey ahead, not helped by the weather turning poor, really heavy rainfall, didn't materially slow us down, as we weren't going fast to start with, but obviously drew even more concentration. We stopped near Gretna again to have tea, which turned out to be a slightly disappointing Harry Ramsdens Fish and Chip (not a true reflection on HR, just that particular location).

It was late when we got home, but the tractors lights worked, so we were able to unload it and sheet it over for the night, tucked up for bed so-to-speak, relieved to be home, and happy to have the Nuffield home at last.

Then came the hard work..............
Last edited by Nuffield_Paul on Wed Oct 14, 2020 5:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Nuffield 3DL (1958), Ferguson TEA20 (1948), Ferguson TEF20 (1954)

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Re: 1958 Nuffield 3DL "Universal Three"

Post by Nuffield_Paul » Mon Oct 12, 2020 9:20 am

I'll probably rearrange these posts at a later date, so that earlier content goes in, and everything is in chronological order.

This weekend saw us working on the fuel and electrical systems of the tractor.

We had suspected for a while that the tractor was wired up wrong. It would crank on the first stage of the key, the start button was non-functional, and no output from the Alternator.

I generally leave the electrical side of the work to my Dad, I think he enjoys that stuff, and understands it better than I do too. The key potion issue was resolved by repositioning the wires on the barrel terminals. We did initially set the wiring up so that the headlights and side lights couldn't come on without the ignition switched on, but then decided against that, and just wired them through their respective switches, so that they could be used without the key in, risk being mitigated by the fact we always disconnect the battery when the tractor is stored.

The fuel circuit hasn't given us any significant cause for concern, but it doesn't hurt to be proactive, and I don't fancy a fuel starvation breakdown on the roadside. I nearly always use white diesel for convenience, and to save on time (and spillage) of changing over regularly, as there are plenty of jobs the tractor does which don't qualify for the use of red diesel. Next I took off the sediment bowl, gave that a clean out, and the gauze directly above it, which wasn't particularly dirty. Quick check and clean of the gauge in the lift pump too, again, not especially dirty. We changed the fuel filter a fortnight ago, as part of the rebuild.

The fuel tank has had a weld repair of the area where the fitting goes in, a new cupped shaped piece, around 4" diameter, replacing that area entirely. The fuel fitting itself has been made to the 'weir' type, so rather than a mesh hat, it has a solid tube, which acts as a weir, and keeps the bottom 1/2" to 1" of the tank from being used, so an area for muck, rust and paint to gather, rather than work its way into the system, but it does mean periodic draining and cleaning is good practice, particularly with modern sulphur free diesel, which is hygroscopic.

Lastly, there has been an out-standing issue with fuel leaks on No.3 injector cap. Initially, all three injector caps, and the fuel return rail leaked, changing the copper washers resolved the leaks in all but No.3, which continued to pee out.

To resolve it, I took the injector cap off, and took a very light skim/polish of the surface using the lathe, and lapped the banjo faces on the surface place. After assembly with new washers (again!) it is now leak tight. Win!

Image

Next was a job which I used to use the Case 895 for, namely grading with the plough, but the Nuffield proved to be a much more suited machine, easier to handle, better hydraulics, great really. Only difference is the Nasher probably handled shuttling between forward and reverse better.
Pops must like the tractor, he was doing my job!
Image

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(Are embedded codes blocked on this forum by the way?) Its worked automatically, but I used to have to put embed codes in for YouTube.
Nuffield 3DL (1958), Ferguson TEA20 (1948), Ferguson TEF20 (1954)

Nuffield_Paul
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Re: 1958 Nuffield 3DL "Universal Three"

Post by Nuffield_Paul » Tue Oct 20, 2020 12:17 pm

Some more work this weekend gone,

The drawbar that came with the tractor looked rather dodgy, parts welded on, and it wasn't really suitable for a towing clevis.

The tractor had a Leyland drawbar as well, but it was a bit on the long side. and this meant the trailer was nose down, but also tended to make the tractor 'nod' excessively. Shortening the drawbar would therefore be desirable, but I'm loathed to modify existing original components, nor do I like welding anything stressed.

So I acquired a new piece of 3" x 3/4" x 18" Black steel, and drilled out the holes to match up the clevis mounting, with the twin holes on the end of the Nuffield drawbar's "hook-on" point, I can share some more pics later on to help clarify what i'm babbling on about.

This is the drill press hewing out the 20mm holes.
Image

Once assembled, the drawbar was 8" shorter than the Leyland bar, and gives me more options as to height, as I can now put the clevis on the top, instead of just the bottom.
Paul.
Nuffield 3DL (1958), Ferguson TEA20 (1948), Ferguson TEF20 (1954)

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Re: 1958 Nuffield 3DL "Universal Three"

Post by Nuffield_Paul » Mon Oct 26, 2020 1:31 pm

This weekend gone was tyre-some. :D

The Nuff arrived with two brand new tyres on the front, and a nearly new (well not very worn) GoodYear TSG on the rear. The other rear is a Kleber radial which is structurally sound, but worn out, this in itself presents a problem in that the tractor is leaning over to one side, that doesn't sound like much, but that subtle tilt means I naturally tilt to one side when driving it, to keep myself level, and that chews my back, I had an accident at work years ago which flares up if I keep my back in an awkward posture for any length of time.

I would have liked to match up the Goodyear with another TSG, which Agriline, to name one, stock, but they're almost £400 each, and realistically, I can buy two Alliance or BKT's for the same price, and still be left with an Excellent Goodyear as a spare. The other possibility was/is that I could get a pair of wider tyres, such as 13.6x28's. I ruled this out on two factors, one, the additional cost, and two, I am not that keen on tractors which look like they are nose down, the 12.4's make the Nuff sit level, and I think the extra 1"+ of height gain with the 13.6's would have been off-putting, so 12.4 it is.

Trouble is, very few places seem to have any 12.4's in stock. But I stumbled across one place that did, and bought one Alliance 324 to try out. It duly arrived next day, and on Sunday, pops and I had a go at changing the tyres over.

The tyre itself is well over 50kgs, so not that easy to throw around. I remember getting the tyres done on the TEA, and the Lady who changed them was slinging them around like car tyres, you don't get to appreciate just how strong someone is (and well practised at their job) till you try and do the same yourself.........!

Nevertheless, we got the old tyre off without too much trouble, the bead breaker disrupted the joint without undue effort, which made a nice change, as I've had some land rover rims over the years which were absolutely EVIL to split!!! The new one went on easy enough, utilising the old tube (which was in excellent condition anyway), it did take some persuading to seat all around the rim as we blew it up, but we didn't have a volume air compressor to hand, so didn't have the bulk flow to make it swell quickly, and seat, but the nylon mallet eventually teased it into place. I'm really happy with these Alliance tyres, so I'll order the second one for the other side now (free delivery means there is no incentive to order both at once if you don't need them both right away).

Image

The next challenge was the diff lock, which was not moving/engaging from the pedal. This turned out to be nothing more (!) than a seized clevis pin, but the pin was well rusted in, and ultimately I had to drill it out to resolve the matter, a new pin, cleaning the surfaces, and some white grease had everything moving sweetly, so I just need to get it slipping to try it out now. :lol:

I've copied the next section straight from another post of mine, as there is no point rewording it.

"My 3DL, has had a mix of hard work (typically heavy towing), and medium work (dozer blade for yard clearing), I've kept idling to a minimum, but when working on setting and adjusting various parts of a tractor, sometimes it just can't be helped.

I store my tractor with the exhaust silencer off, as it allows me to sheet it over, albeit inside of the shed, but said garage has an irritating leak in one area, so I cover the tractor to be sure. Yesterday we noticed a tiny bit of oily liquid in the exhaust on the silencer inner face, and on the enlarged exhaust flange I fitted. It wasn't bad, but it was noticeable, implying our troubles from earlier with the tractor had returned. So after fitting the new back tyre, I hooked the trailer up to go over home to collect some building materials. The trailer had probably 1/2 tonne of rubble in already, and I deliberately left that in for some extra load in the "out" journey direction. Added another 1/2 tonne at least when I got to my house, and then drove back. About twenty-twenty five minutes each way, and kept her to around 2000-2100rpm. the route is hilly, and one bit on the way out, she bogged down to 1500rpm with full-throttle in 5th, but rallied and got back upto speed.

After all that, I took the stack back off in the garage, and it was dry, with just a light coating of soot on it".

Thanks, Paul.
Nuffield 3DL (1958), Ferguson TEA20 (1948), Ferguson TEF20 (1954)

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Re: 1958 Nuffield 3DL "Universal Three"

Post by Nuffield_Paul » Wed Oct 28, 2020 4:58 pm

The next challenge I'm looking at on the Nuff, is the noisy fuel pump. There is a really loud clatter coming from that end/side of the tractor. I originally thought this may be a heavily worn fuel pump, as changing the oil in the pump quietened it a little. In reality, I've been advised that the pump drive disc is the real culprit, and sure enough, a quick check the other night, revealed the noise when I tried to move the disc.

The same person advised me that the rubber coupling setup from the 10-60 can be used, however speaking to Andy Griffin, that isn't exactly right, the three and four cylinder fuel pumps use different tapers for the driveshaft, so you can do it, but need to machine the coupling to suit.

With this in mind, and my general orientation towards originality on this tractor (!), I'll replace the drive with the correct type, which will involve removing the pump and re-timing. For now, I'm thinking about putting a tiny amount of RTV into the wearing areas of the coupling between the disc and the dog(s) to make a cushion, its a bodge, but only a temporary one, and low risk.

Paul.
Nuffield 3DL (1958), Ferguson TEA20 (1948), Ferguson TEF20 (1954)

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Re: 1958 Nuffield 3DL "Universal Three"

Post by Nuffield_Paul » Sun Nov 08, 2020 9:40 pm

I haven't done the repair on the fuel pump drive as yet, a couple of other tasks got in the way on the house project.

I had some timber/firewood to collect on Saturday for our somewhat modest bonfire, which would also mean some more junk removed from the house (so a happy wife). With this in mid, the Nuff came out to play. Its been parked in the shed with the dozer blade on the back lately, as thats been the main job, what with lots of leaves and mulch on the road. So I thought I'd give the road another clean before dropping the blade off and picking up the trailer.

That didn't go well.

About five minutes in, she conked, fuel starvation. I've cleaned the fuel system out before, but I knew that there was some loose paint in the well of the tank, so more trouble was always on the horizon, but keeping a decent amount of fuel in the tank usually reduced sloshing, and thus the chance of the paint getting swirled up and sucked down the fuel pipe. The old gauze that goes on the tank outlet had long since been relieved of its top mesh, but still had the sides, to create something of a weir for the fuel, but it still managed to draw muck/paint down, and block the pipe. This blockage was swiftly dealt with (blowback), but the lift pump internal gauze was also giving trouble, and this also had to be resolved. Its a plastic gauze, and had warped over time, so was inhibiting the seal, as well as not doing any filtering, so I've got that to replace, for now, its running without it.

Another decent run over home and back, and mission accomplished without any breakdowns on the road, but the fuel starvation is a bit of a worry, I keep the tools needed on the tractors toolbox, just in case, but I will be taking the tank fitting out to fit a new, taller mesh weir (that part of the tank has been replaced with new metal, so it should be okay), and I do plan to take the tank off and slosh it around with some chain, to de-scale the loose paint, and then seal it with a high quality ethonal/biodiesel-safe tank sealant.


Today I collected a new (cough!) plough for the Nuff, a Kverneland Hydrein 12" plough. I'm not hugely up on these particular ploughs, but I believe it was a 3+1 job, a three furrow plough with a fourth bolted on that could pivot out. I think the different colour of the final beam suggested in reality this was originally a 2+1 job, so the third frame was the one with the greased pivot pin, not the fourth. It came with a fair few spares, and I think with a bit of time and patience, it'll make a sound two or three furrow plough. I will probably have to make a depth wheel at the rear though, as the Nuff has position control only.

We stripped the fourth furrow off whilst the plough was on the trailer, and as we couldn't free off the end plate that was on the fourth, we took the third leg off as well for the time being. Not sure if we'll go 2F or 3F yet, it'll depend on what good parts there is, and how the Nuff pulls it, but I wouldn't be surprised if we go 2F to make it easier to handle. Had we kept the Nasher, it would have no doubt played with all four furrows.


Paul.
Nuffield 3DL (1958), Ferguson TEA20 (1948), Ferguson TEF20 (1954)

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Re: 1958 Nuffield 3DL "Universal Three"

Post by Freggel » Tue Nov 10, 2020 10:55 am

Nuffield_Paul wrote:
Wed Oct 28, 2020 4:58 pm
The next challenge I'm looking at on the Nuff, is the noisy fuel pump. There is a really loud clatter coming from that end/side of the tractor. I originally thought this may be a heavily worn fuel pump, as changing the oil in the pump quietened it a little. In reality, I've been advised that the pump drive disc is the real culprit, and sure enough, a quick check the other night, revealed the noise when I tried to move the disc.

The same person advised me that the rubber coupling setup from the 10-60 can be used, however speaking to Andy Griffin, that isn't exactly right, the three and four cylinder fuel pumps use different tapers for the driveshaft, so you can do it, but need to machine the coupling to suit.
Hi Paul, the person with the advise on Facebook was me. I replaced the fibre coupling on my Universal Four with the rubber one from a 10-60. I though the couplings were exchangeable, didn't know the Universal 3 three had a different shaft taper. That would mean the fibre disc coupling from a Universal 3 and Universal 4 are also not exchangeable. I thought they are all the same... You learn something new every day!
1957 Universal Four 4DM
If it ain't broke, fix it until it is!

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Re: 1958 Nuffield 3DL "Universal Three"

Post by Nuffield_Paul » Tue Nov 10, 2020 11:13 am

Freggel wrote:
Tue Nov 10, 2020 10:55 am
Nuffield_Paul wrote:
Wed Oct 28, 2020 4:58 pm
The next challenge I'm looking at on the Nuff, is the noisy fuel pump. There is a really loud clatter coming from that end/side of the tractor. I originally thought this may be a heavily worn fuel pump, as changing the oil in the pump quietened it a little. In reality, I've been advised that the pump drive disc is the real culprit, and sure enough, a quick check the other night, revealed the noise when I tried to move the disc.

The same person advised me that the rubber coupling setup from the 10-60 can be used, however speaking to Andy Griffin, that isn't exactly right, the three and four cylinder fuel pumps use different tapers for the driveshaft, so you can do it, but need to machine the coupling to suit.
Hi Paul, the person with the advise on Facebook was me. I replaced the fibre coupling on my Universal Four with the rubber one from a 10-60. I though the couplings were exchangeable, didn't know the Universal 3 three had a different shaft taper. That would mean the fibre disc coupling from a Universal 3 and Universal 4 are also not exchangeable. I thought they are all the same... You learn something new every day!
Thanks Freggel,

Yes much appreciated. sometimes I like to have info from multiple sources, simple so I can make a reasoned decision, as like you, I didn't know the shafts on the drive had different tapers.

Make no mistake, the coupling can be made to fit, but either it's taper, or that on the shaft needs changing. I don't think the difference is huge, but its enough that the land would not be accurate, or lasting.

Cheers, Paul.
Nuffield 3DL (1958), Ferguson TEA20 (1948), Ferguson TEF20 (1954)

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