Leyland 272 brakes

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KirkFitzpatrick
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2021 6:17 pm
Great Britain

Leyland 272 brakes

Post by KirkFitzpatrick »

hello,
i am just fixing a 1976 272 Q Cab i have just bought ,the brakes do not work - 1 have both the master cylinders out and they are rusty and have ordered new ones i have also ordered 2 new slave cylinders as well as flexible hoses
The reservoir was empty no fluid - I am hoping this may fix the no brakes problem,I have also been told the dry brakes could need replacing as the tractor has 4000 hours on it can this be done with the cab on?
also the hand brake does not work i am hoping this maybe linked to the cylinders issue?

Sorry to be a nuisance just dont know anything about tractors :D

Thanks
Kirk


Nowtnew
Senior Member
Posts: 637
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2018 8:49 am
Great Britain

Re: Leyland 272 brakes

Post by Nowtnew »

Hi
Your knowledge is about to improve by leaps and bounds!
I think you are on the right track - (Second master cylinder for clutch?).
Not sure about brake access on Q cab. I think there has been a discussion somewhere about this. Certainly possible on earlier rattle cab but you have a bit to be going on with before you need to worry about that.
Good Luck
eastfield
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2018 2:16 pm
Ireland

Re: Leyland 272 brakes

Post by eastfield »

Hi Kirk, I have a1979 Leyland 272 Q cab synchromesh. I recently started to ‘ restore it. The following needed a lot of ‘attention’ as it was left out in the elements and was badly covered for a few years , steering mechanism as ball joints were lose and bearing and dust caps needed replacing All now done. The electrics - only thing working is the ignition.
The roof as it got a bit buckled - having been caught by a tree branch. THE BRAKES. The whole lot were totally ceased up - the hand brake, the 3 pedals, the cross shaft which is part of the handbrake system and the mechanism inside bout the master and slave cylinders. I also sheared off the nut on one of the two levers - operating - which the slave cylinder is bolted to. This meant that I had to take out the pin around which the two levers move on.. Pin was totally totally stuck in its position.
You might check the clutch and brake fluid reservoirs. Mine had perished. I also replaced one of the iron pipes carrying the brake fluid from the reservoir back to a slave cylinder as I noted a bit of wear on one of them
By using a combination of brute force, WD 40 , diesel, heat followed by cold water, loads of patience, time, range of tools- both home made for very specific jobs and purchased tools I eventually got things moving . I suggest you go right through the whole brake system - both manual and fluid and get it all moving freely first.
I was able to take out the actuator without taking off the cab. Access was helped by removing the wheel - one at a time and have the axle VERY SECURElY PROPPED UP. I fitted back the same cylinders having got them blown out . Cleaned them with P2000 sandpaper.

Current task.
Am now trying to adjust the brakes having put back everything. Am doing handbrake first. The books recommend that , with the handbrake off you twist the nylon nut - located between the levers ( operating) and which the slave cylinder is bolted to- until the back wheels cannot be turned by hand - having jacked up the back wheels. You then turn the nut back one round.
A PROBLEM. I have twisted both nuts into the last and the wheels are still turning freely. Both actuators systems have new balls , springs and discs fitted. Is it possible that both actuators are a bit too clockwise or anti clockwise when I was putting them back in- just a thought at this point. I was thinking of taking off the nylon nuts and adding a few washers so that the actuator bolt can be pulled out further. I am not a trained mechanic but am interested in maintaining /repairing/ restoring things

Finally , any advice re by brake adjustment problem would be appreciated from any club member.

Kirk, if you want any specific advice on how to remove any bolt , clevis pin or whatever please do not hesitate to ask me - as some of these items are in quiet inaccessible areas - i hope that you have not big shovels of hands for this job
eastfield
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2018 2:16 pm
Ireland

Re: Leyland 272 brakes

Post by eastfield »

SOLVED brake adjustment problem. Having freed up the complete brake system and to start adjusting same I followed the instructions in the , Repair Operation Manual’. I thought that I had screwed the adjusting nut up to the last but the wheel was still free - no sign of even an attempt to brake. I was baffled as to what might be going on.
I decided to closely inspect and I removed the ‘ tuning fork’ shaped part that’s attached underneath the slave cylinder to the two levers- operating. I then removed the slave cylinder and left it dangle from the flexible tube attached to it. The special short scanner which I got from charnleys is difficult to work with in the space where the adjusting nut is SO I got a proper PLUG scanner which was twice the length and, LOW AND BEHOLD, I was able to screw the adjusting nut in further and to the point where the wheel braked solidly. I unscrewed the adjusting nutby 6 flats( one full circle)- as recommended but with the slave cylinder in place.When I put back the slave cylinder I found that the wheel was still braked. I took off slave cylinder again and unscrewed nut two full circles - an educated guess- and reassembled again and now the wheel is turning.
The problem was that I was not able to apply enough strength to turn the adjusting nut with the very short Charnley socket wrench. I felt at the time that I had screwed it into the last thread. So the standard plug socket is ‘your only man’
Hope the above is of some help to ‘fellow amateurs’ !,,,!,,,,,,,!!!!
KirkFitzpatrick
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2021 6:17 pm
Great Britain

Re: Leyland 272 brakes

Post by KirkFitzpatrick »

thanks for the replies I have such issues getting the left master cylinder out the lower nut had sized to the bolt due to leaking brake fluid i think - i just could not hold the nut in the small cavity its in ,tried wedging it with screw drivers no way to get a socket on it - in the end i had to remove the whole pedal system to get access to nut.

I have now replaced both brake master cylinders - and cleaned reservoir replace pipe and clips took me 8 hours.
I am now going to start on the slave cylinders going to remove the wheel - just tried to undo one wheel nut 3/4 drive with a bar and a scaffold tube solid as a rock will try wd40 and some heat.

I will try and post some pictures on this 272 its solid as a rock couple of small rust holes in back of roof and thats it its a barn find - been in barn for 15 years 1 owner from new has all original glass seat - needs a new exhaust and brakes and full service runs and drives good
ARFCsaturday
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2021 11:15 am
Great Britain

Re: Leyland 270 brakes

Post by ARFCsaturday »

Hi. We run a Saturday crew at our local rugby club. We have a 1970 ish Leyland 270. Good workhorse with us doing basic maintenance. The brakes are now non existent. Are they easy to replace by enthusiastic amateurs!? We know that they are onboard but we can’t find any manuals to refer to to decide if we can fix them ourselves. Any guidance would be appreciated. Cheers.
Nowtnew
Senior Member
Posts: 637
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2018 8:49 am
Great Britain

Re: Leyland 272 brakes

Post by Nowtnew »

There is a lot of information on this forum. Various workshop manuals are in the downloads section and the JVP section has an article on dry brakes. Make sure you are signed in when you look for the forum. The 4/65 manual should be relevant.

The answer to your question is 'yes'. There are two elements. On a 270 there are no hydraulics to worry about but the mechanical linkage must all be sound. The whole assembly comes off with four bolts and all the bushes are standard Imperial sized phosphor bronze 'Oilite' types if they need renewal.
Expect some difficulty with clevis pins on the linkage if, as is likely, they have not been oiled. The second element is the friction brakes themselves. A precaution here, the original linings may well have been asbestos so don't blow the dust about. If the tractor has a cab, the brakes can still be accessed, but it is more fiddly.

Good luck.
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