Austin Tractor Restoration.

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Flocar
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Austin Tractor Restoration.

Post by Flocar »

I am restoring a badly damaged 1922 Austin Tractor. The question I have is - on this forum, under which banner would an Austin tractor fit? I would like to show aspects of the restoration if you would like to read about it and perhaps you may offer help or suggestions.
*topic moved to miscellaneous* Jeroen


mike.l
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Re: Austin Tractor Restoration.

Post by mike.l »

Hi I hope they fit you in somewhere as i would love to read about restoration mike
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Jeroen Sleijpen
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Re: Austin Tractor Restoration.

Post by Jeroen Sleijpen »

Looking forward to your restoration progress!

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Flocar
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Re: Austin Tractor Restoration.

Post by Flocar »

I have taken on a mamoth task for our local Historical Village. We have a 1922 Austin tractor. Pretty rare in Australia. A rough but running one recently sold for $15,500 at auction. Unfortunately ours ended up in the creek while pumping water. Much of the cast cracked due to the hot parts hitting cold water. Also the front axle is badly bent. Everything is now well and truely rusted up as it has been in the open air ever since. I have been working for months, at 3 hours a week, just getting the axle off and dismantled so our blacksmiths can straighten the cast iron axle. The most difficult bit has been removing what appears to be cotter pin that appear to hold the king pins in. They would not come out as they usually do. I have broken three drills trying to drill them out when they hit the king pin. So I have the axle at home so I can use the drill press. The king pins turn with the stub axle so not sure how the cotter works. I drilled the first one completely out before I could remove the king pin. The king pin has a thread in it that allows it to be withdrawn with a bolt. But of course the bolt snapped so I have had to cut a hole in the bottom of the casting where the king pin fits. It took the full 20 tonnes of my press to eventually move the king pin. Interestingly it only has a small dimple in the king pin where the cotter goes. So I am trying to get the other cotter pin out without drilling it so I can figure out how it works. I have a feeling it may have a spring loaded ball bearing the helps hold the steering central. But really I don't know. Most other bits have to be cut with and angle grinder as they are totally rusted. The timing gearing is all missing although I am sure that I can find something else that will fit. The sump was full of silt and an internal splash pan all but rusted away. Even cleaning out almost 100 year old silt took hours and hours with a chisel and hammer. I have repaired a rotted aluminium cast pipe taking water from the head to the radiator. I used JB epoxy metal. I will have to put the cotter in the press but the thing is really difficult to hold in the press as nothing is square or flat. Of course I have already broken or sheared off a large number of bolts and studs. But my research has been interesting to say the least. I have decided I need a mill and lathe for this project so they are also under construction at the same time. Will it ever run. 😀😀😀 But I would like to think I was that clever. But it is very doubtful. At my current work rate in the end I think at my age and time will beat me. I will find some photos later.
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Jeroen Sleijpen
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Re: Austin Tractor Restoration.

Post by Jeroen Sleijpen »

That sounds like a huge job, but worth the effort as it's that rare. Looking forward to some pictures!
Does it look like this model?
Image
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Flocar
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Re: Austin Tractor Restoration.

Post by Flocar »

Yes that is the tractor. This photo shows an early model with thermosyphon cooling. The water pump from mine is missing and I am going to leave it as a thermosyphon. The colours seem to me to be correct for an early model. Later models were mostly light blue although there was a few in other colours. The wording "Iron Duke" is interesting and not normally on Austins. Was it put there on an earlier restoration? Or was it put there by a proud owner when he bought the tractor? Or was it put on by the factory because the tractor was used at ploughing competitions or sales pitches?

Unfortunately in my mess of photos I cannot find the original photo I took of my machine but I do have some of some of the damaged parts.

Image
The top aluminium pipe engine to radiator.

Image
Pressing out a king pin.
Image
Attempt to drill out the front axle centre pivot. But even a tungston tip drill wouldn't touch it. So it is still there. I will need to manufacture a new one so perhaps heating the axle will release the pivot. else an oxy torch may be needed.
Flocar
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Re: Austin Tractor Restoration.

Post by Flocar »

Now an aside to the tractor story I guess is that I determined I needed a milling machine and a lathe. Now to build the lathe I needed a mill. And to build the mill I needed a lathe. Also to build the lathe I wanted a sheet metal press that would press upto a 6 foot sheet. Funds to buy these machines out right don't exist (not in the family budget ). So I decided to make a mill to what I call stage 1. That is it has an angle grinder or die grinder attached rather than the normal quill. That would allow me to clean up oxy cut plate for a lathe and square it off. This photo is of the mill that is at stage one with a piece of 1/2 inch steel plate in the vice. I purchased the mill vice and XY plate the rest has been constructed from bits from several of my mates scrap bins. Actually the grinder is very effective and I believe I can use it to make the rack for the lathe. Once I have the lathe built I will make a proper quill for the mill.


Image

I then started the lathe but I needed a large sheet metal press as I wanted my lathe to have a swarf/oil tray. Also I would need the press to build the engine covers for the tractor. So I have started on them photos later.
Flocar
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Re: Austin Tractor Restoration.

Post by Flocar »

I should have pointed out that the Austins are rare in Australia. One sources says 8 came here but I can account for 5 so perhaps more tha 8 came or 8 came to the state of Queensland. I don't intend to research that any more at this stage.
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JohnP
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Re: Austin Tractor Restoration.

Post by JohnP »

I took these pictures at a show a few years ago, it claims to having been built in 1919.

Image


Image

Here's some text from Tractordata.co.uk

"During 1917 Herbert Austin was running his own large and thriving car and lorry factory at Longbridge, Birmingham. In addition to this he was the agent and importer for several makers of American tractors.
In 1918 he disposed of those interests and started to design his own tractor, the design of which owed a great deal to the Fordson. The exception was the gearbox which was a transverse two-speed unit rather than the Fordson three-speed in-line gearbox.
Power was provided by a modified Austin 'Heavy 20' car engine modified to run on paraffin. This unit was considerably more refined and somewhat more powerful than the Fordson unit, but with breaking crankshafts and other problems it never shared it's rivals reputation for reliability.
Though more expensive than the Fordson it enjoyed a brief period of popularity from 1919 to 1924 and during that time contributed greatly to solving Austin's post war financial problems.
With the advent of the Austin 7 car, production was moved to France, where it continued in modified form with only moderate success until about 1951"
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Flocar
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Australia

Re: Austin Tractor Restoration.

Post by Flocar »

It is certainly an early model as it has thermosyphone as opposed to later models that had a water pump. Also early models were dark blue later models were mostly light blue although a few were yellow and some green. Not that the paint means a lot. Mine should probably be light blue but I am returning it to thermosyphone as the water pump is missing and I prefer dark blue anyway.
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